Diversity Works

Diversity Works, and it starts with you!

Whether you are a corporation,  a nonprofit, a LGBT certified business or ally, or just someone curious about how Diversity Works, we’re glad you’re here.

We are a marketing and communications agency that supports enterprises in developing and implementing creative approaches to tell their diversity story. Through innovative traditional and social media, videos, community events, and other opportunities, we help our clients get their creative gears in motion.

Then, our unique process, LGBT Brand Integration, moves entities into high gear, Turning Your Pride Into Profit. TM

http://diversityworksllc.com/

Gender Economics and Diversity for Organisations

Gender Economics is an emerging field of study, with the 2012  international conference now under way in Spain.  Gender Economics encourages organisations, and indeed countries to use all the resources available to them across both gender and diversity to improve economies, improve profitability and market share.

Many organisations in Australia recognise the positive and enriching qualities of ‘diversity’ and many of these organisations are also at the forefront of the gender equality issue.   Westpac Bank has already done a lot of work around gender equality and diversity and continues to promote initiatives that increase leadership opportunities for women in senior management.  However, there are other organisations that pay ‘lip service’ to diversity, flexibility and gender equality, yet these same organisations still qualify as a “Women’s Employer of Choice”.

True diversity and gender equality doesn’t just fit into the normalised view of a ‘gender stereotype’ for female friendly workplaces, like nursing stations and flexible working hours. Whilst these facilities are great regardless of gender, it is still in senior management that we see discrimination and “Boys Club” practices at work.  If we changed the structure of our workplaces as well as the way that they run many would attract and keep more senior women.  For example, developing alternative value measurements for success, true workplace audits that dig deep to name “Boys Club” practices and move away from what we are socially conditioned to believe women want in the workplace.  In my experience the single most destructive element that prevents women remaining in and moving into leadership roles is the “Boys Club” element and the way both women and men support it.  How can an organisation that purports to be a “Women’s Employer of Choice”, be serious when all its Board members are male?   By which standard is the organisation developing its criteria to promote women?  How can a patriarchal, primarily white male, Anglo-Saxon board structure really identify the needs and aspirations of the diverse groups of people in their organisation?

Gender Economics aims to develop these new metrics for success.  Metrics that make sure that women and minorities have a direct impact on the economy and not an indirect impact on the economy via consumerism and social dependency.   Not only would your organisation benefit by tapping into more resources, and advancing more women into leadership roles,  I believe that Gender Economics will deliver greater access to a diverse customer base by understanding alternative measures of ‘value’ against revenue.

Gender Diversity makes a difference to the ‘bottom line’

Diversity makes a difference, see the latest research by WOB (Women on Boards). Article By Claire Braund on  17 February 2012 in the Australian Mining Magazine and Shared by Dorothy Jakab and 1 more in WOB Women on Boards via LinkedIn.

The article notes some important statistics which make a strong case for an increase in women’s representation on boards and leadership positions;

“In 2004 the US-based non-profit organisation Catalyst created the link between female board directors and corporate performance in its report ‘The Bottom Line: Corporate Performance and Women’s Representation of Boards’.

The report found higher financial performance for companies with higher representation of women board directors in three important measures – return on equity, return on sales and return on invested capital.

Fast forward to Australia in October 2011 and the non-profit research organisation Reibey Institute found that over three and five year periods, ASX500 companies with women directors delivered significantly higher return on equity (ROE) than those companies without any women on their boards.

In between 2004 and 2011 there were a number of significant studies and reports successfully prosecuting the business case for recruiting and retaining women into senior leadership roles and onto boards.”

The article further discusses the need for a full utilisation of all human resources, male and female in reference to the current resource shortage in the Australian Mining Industry where good resources are hard to come by.

“In Australia, this will require a significant shift in corporate culture and in the attitudes and behavior of many who occupy positions of power.

The mining sector is a dominant player in the Australian economy with major human resource demands. Surely, of all sectors it should be the one that understands the importance of a fully deployed labour force and the business benefits that diversity brings?”

Economically, Gender Diversity makes sense.

References:  Australian Mining Magazine