Become a Game Changer – attend THE GENDER ECONOMICS GLOBAL CONFERENCE 2014

REMINDER; 6 weeks to go!  JUNE 10 AND 11

Become a Game Changer – you are invited to attend THE GENDER ECONOMICS GLOBAL CONFERENCE 2014

Do you want to change the way we view gender, or have a closer look at the way economic policy is formed and how it impacts your life?  Ever thought about the value of Diversity and Gender Balance and not had a forum in which to discuss your opinions and work towards real solutions – want more than a talk fest?  Well the Centre for Gender Economics and Innovation (C4GEi) is pleased to present the inaugural Gender Economics Global Conference 2014 which brings together international speakers, leading academics as well as practitioners in the fields of Diversity, Economics, Sociology, Business Investment, Gender, Innovation and Leadership.

As a ‘Game Changer’, be prepared to discuss, debate and explore your own experiences in relation to the conference streams of Policy, Investment, Environment, and Innovation and Health.  This is the place where you can speak up and make a difference!

Book your seat NOW by going directly to the website at http://www.centreforgendereconomics.org or register directly on Eventbrite by clicking the button at the bottom of this page.

Gender Economics is a new field of study that looks at the way that economic policy is formed and how this flows through to business and society.  By looking at things differently, I believe we will create sustainable and positive change.  The Conference is an opportunity to work together to uncover new discourses to existing issues, reframing the way we think about ourselves, our workplaces and society.

Your opinion does matter, and your participation in this conference will make a difference.  The Centre for Gender Economics and Innovation, Australia™ (C4GEi™) will combine the outcomes from the conference, and current research to develop positive and practical solutions for business and you can be part of the ground breaking and exciting field of Gender Economics and Diversity Economics!  The conference offers you the opportunity to see speakers in the Plenary sessions that align with your interests.  You can then find out the latest research to compliment these talks by attending one of the concurrent Academic Sessions.

Finally you can make a difference by participating in one or all of the Working Sessions.  These important sessions give you a chance to be a “Game Changer” and they will focus on;

  1. Wealth and Influence – Exploring your attitudes and approached to material wealth and how you can create the means to have greater influence
  2. Innovation – Where it comes from, why it is important as well as social and structural influences that assist or derail innovation
  3. Empowered Identity – How to empower your decisions, actions and outcomes by exploring assumptions and beliefs about gender roles that support or diminish your own sense of Identity and purpose

In the facilitated working sessions we will harvest people’s insights from what they have heard and the facilitators will use their expertise to help you to discover opportunities for you to break through outdated paradigms and claim your purpose to influence and change those around you.

Please be prepared to discuss, debate and explore your own experiences in relation to these topics

OUTPUTS from the Sessions;

  • The plenary closing session will provide a brief summary of themes arising from the Working Sessions
  • The plenary sessions and academic session talks will be further analysed and processed and feedback provided to participants, sponsors and facilitators.
  • This material will be further collated and integrated in the Centre for Gender Economics and Innovation with my existing research from the Diversity Program Review Framework (DPRF) that is currently being rolled out to the mining industry as the AWRA Recognised Program through AMMA
  • Finally Facilitator Reports, selected Academic Papers and presentations coupled with further research will culminate in the publication of a book on Gender Economics and rolled forward to the next conference planned for September 2015 in Detroit, USA.  You can be part of this journey!

Be part of leading-edge thinking and come to this game changing event!

We are really excited about the conference venue at the UNSW, in this fantastic new facility that enables and promotes collaboration, sponsored by the UNSW and catering sponsored by theNAB (National Australia Bank).  If you are already going to a Women’s Leadership or Empowerment event, that’s great!  You will already feel inspired, validated and moved by what you hear.  Take it a step further, and then come along to this event, to engage, get down to work and create some committed outcomes!  We are offering a platform for some really important work that will change the way the world thinks about Gender Economics and pave he way towards Wealth, Influence, Innovation and Personal Empowerment for anyone who wishes it, regardless of gender.

YOUTH PANEL

I am super pleased to announce that we will have a Youth Panel of Year 11 and 12 girls fromKincoppal Rose Bay School, Vaucluse and I will be working with teachers to blend the conference streams with their current study.  This will be a fantastic session where the girls will get to the opportunity to speak to an international audience on the Plenary stage.  We will get to hear the latest ideas from our youth – this is something to really look forward to.

The conference program, held over 2 days 10-11 June 2014,  comprises two full days of plenary sessions, panel discussions, plus a number of presentations selected from a call for papers process, as well as the Working sessions.

The conference format will be relaxed but retain a ‘working’ focus that encourages discussion and gives time for individuals to connect with others in a ‘trade delegation’ environment. We expect delegates from around the world to attend the conference and this will provide a good opportunity for cross cultural discussion and networking.

Thank you to Virgin Australia who are supporting the conference by offering discounts on Domestic Flights to and from Sydney.  Go to the website here for more information on how to book.

MY VISION for the Conference is that it is a place to get some work done that provides for practical and sustainable solutions to gender equity.

See you there!

Susanne Moore
Founder and CEO,
The Centre for Gender Economics and Innovation (C4GEi)
Sydney NSW Australia
susanne@gendereconomics.com
+61 439 420 897

Thank you to our generous sponsors!

The University of New South Wales

High St

Kensington

Sydney, New South Wales 2052

 

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ThriveAbility — Waymaker for the Next Economic Paradigm: A Dialogue with Ralph Thurm

This interview with Ralph Thurm has some interesting idea’s about our need to change the way we look at economics and sustainability and has some relevance to Gender Economics.  He says in the interview;

Our current economic system is based on an unsustainable, high-stress, linear economy powered by fear, fossil fuels, materialism and a focus on financial success. Maintaining this rationale will both cause irreversible damages to planet Earth as the mother of all life, and trigger the emergence and increase of social dissonances due to discontent, population growth, demographic change and increasing social inequalities”

Image credit: TEDx RSM

This is a similar concept to Gender Economics and the idea that we have largely ‘masculinised’ our economic system which predominately works on the idea of scarcity, which I think puts greater emphasis on fear and power  particularly in a market economy where everything has a price.

See the full article here

ThriveAbility — Waymaker for the Next Economic Paradigm: A Dialogue with Ralph Thurm

http://www.sustainablebrands.com/news_and_views/new_metrics/bill_baue/thriveability_waymaker_next_economic_paradigm_dialogue_ralph_th?utm_source=Twitter&utm_medium=schtweets&utm_campaign=editorial

Gender Economics is about the way we use gender for economic advantage, its not a women’s issue.

Men have used gender to decide their business strategy for centuries. Think the new television show Mr Selfridge about the start of the Selfridges shopping empire and the trend of shopping for leisure which exploited women’s emerging need to assert themselves as individuals.  As the time that the suffragette movement was emerging most women didn’t work outside the home, but shopping gave them a way to express their individuality.  And they liked it!  Think about car advertising and football and how we see targeted campaigns for men or for women to entice them to their brands.  These all have attributes of gender economics so when you think it doesn’t apply to you – think again.  Ask yourself why you recently brought that Jeep, or you think its OK to gamble at a Casino.

Many men think that Gender Economics is a women’s issue, but it is not.  Men have a gendered role which is often stereotyped and restrictive.  They can be just as affected by gendered decisions as women, and there are clear cases where this exists.  Often these decisions are coupled with values based judgements that see the intersection of race and gender, much like the idea for some that all young Muslim men must be terrorists.  Of course this isn’t true, but think about the policies and laws that have already been put into place using underlying assumptions about men and women, culture and religion.   Although some of these polices can be positive, many end up degrading the lives of people because of a judgement made about their gender.

Check out the conference site www.centreforgendereconomics.org for more examples.

ABOUT GENDER ECONOMICS

Article written by Susanne Moore – The Centre for Gender Economics 1 November 2013

Gender Economics is the fusion of sociology, economics and gender studies and looks at shifting current perceptions of gender and how we use these perceptions in framing economic policy. Very often, it is an intersection of gender, values and beliefs that create policy decisions, many of which are based on outdated models. It is important that we start to understand how economic research is conducted, how the statistical analysis is created and how this flows into policy decisions and ultimately the business bottom line.

“Gender Economics is about “dissecting and creating a new discourse around economic theory that fuses Economics, Gender and Sociology”[1]

Think of a persistent organisational challenge and start to unpick it by looking at the assumptions and environments that created the challenge in the first place, chances are the core of the challenge has been created by imposing outdated business models, values and measurements that no longer work.  Then reframe the challenge by applying new thought paradigms and you may very likely uncover innovations that lead to increases in performance.  Traditional gender stereotypes have shifted and organisations can no longer assume that they are catering to the working heterosexual white male with a wife at home because the ground rules have changed.  According to Wikipedia[2], the US LGBT consumer market in 2013 ‘is estimated to have an overall buying power of more than $835 billion’.  This demonstrates that marketing to this group requires specialisation to reap the benefits of that economy.

Much of our business culture is centuries old from the structures to the drivers, and our organisations must change to keep pace with a global economy where diversity, and cross-cultural management enforce new skills around managing complexity.

In 2009, the Harvard Business Review[3] made the bold statement that “Women now drive the world economy”, and estimated that globally women will control about $20 trillion in annual consumer spending over the next five years.  Look at any social networking site or news stream and you will see articles that recognise that the financial empowerment of women is a game changer.  Businesses must now attract talent from a wider pool, some from necessity, but many recognising that by developing a “Women’s Employer of Choice” reputation, it will ultimately help them increase their competitiveness in the market.  However, it is not as simple as painting women’s issues with a ‘pink’ brush,  organisations must understand the shifts that have taken place in gendered stereotypes and how this sociological change now affects business structures and changes in economic policy formation.

Gender Economics looks at how gender influences economic decisions and how those decisions impact gender.  The way we target gender for economic gain or increased market share can either benefit or degrade the rights of marginalised groups, often leading to policy formation with an underlying gender bias overlaid with a view on how economics, policy and gender interact with society.

This emerging field challenges current economic theory, broadening the conversation to encompasses sociological complexities currently at play in society – ie: we look to deconstruct economic policy, reconstructing it in a manner that allows us to develop rational and objective tracks for further research.  Issues of female inequality have persisted for decades if not centuries and instead of talking about the issues, Gender Economics explores underneath the issue and provides new discourses that have the power to change the way we work and live.  A simple example of Gender Economics and a persistent issue is the gender wage gap in Australia that continues regardless of the amount of effort and talk that goes on.  In 1907 Australia passed a little known policy known as the “Harvester Judgement[4] that saw the start of the pay gap for women in preference to that of the ‘working family man’.  This policy was introduced primarily to give organisations a competitive advantage using cheaper female labour.  This precedent continues today with feminised work segments in organisations exploiting cheaper labour, focusing on scarcity instead of the abundance of leveraging that diversity through innovation[5].

Much of our business culture is centred on the concept of scarcity, of not enough to go around but where did this thinking process start?  Staying competitive by having unique products that differentiate you from the rest of the marketplace can lead to a culture of aggressive competition and cost cutting.  With more organisations becoming lean and agile what if the model moved from one of scarcity to one of ‘abundance’.  What are the attributes of abundance, is it just a mind shift or can we create business models that promote it?  Numerous studies of company board makeup show that the accepted female attributes of sharing and collaboration lead to a richer business environment and higher profits.

Gender Economics is the new Business Transformation, the next major resource, and will open a channel to increased innovation and creativity through Diversity of thought and the ability to maximise the management of our increasingly complex environments.  Organisations that understand that gender balance is the new competitive edge will be better equipped in a global marketplace where women take their place at the decision table.  An increased awareness of women’s economic impact at a country level and greater gender diversity at a company level means women are learning to invest in themselves and their financial future.

There are many persistent gender issue’s that just don’t seem to go away and this is particularly true in areas of gender inequality, and I feel that this is because we so often talk ‘around’ the issues instead of deconstructing them and understanding why they are issues in the first place.  The next steps are to start unpicking current thinking on economics and business, start reframing our thinking, putting age-old issues into new contexts – that is Gender Economics at its core!


[1] Quote by Susanne Moore 2013

[4] MacIntyre, Stuart (1985) ‘A fair wage’ in Winners and Losers: The Pursuit of Social Justice in Australian History, Sydney: Allen & Unwin, Ch.3, pp. 51-58 (excerpt)

[5] Diversity Program Review Framework™, Susanne Moore (2012)

“The trouble with gender economics”, The Guardian 2011

reblogged from The Guardian

Original Post by

Thursday 19 May 2011 01.59 EST

At a global summit in Paris, France, MPs from around the world argued that investing in girls can spur economic growth. But the economic case for gender equality has its critics

MDG : Young girl in class at Makuyuni school in the Monduli District, Tanzania, Africa.

Young girls attend Makuyuni school in the Monduli District, Tanzania, Africa. Photograph by Graeme Robertson for the Guardian

Family planning is notoriously one of the most politicised and divisive issues in development debates, and gender equality one of the most neglected. But over the past few years, advocates for both have emerged from across the political spectrum and from some of the most unlikely sources – including the World Bank. This week, a diverse group of parliamentarians from around the world gathered at the French Assemblée Nationale before next week’s G8 summit, calling for a special focus on the 600 million girls and young women in developing countries around the world.

Organised by the European parliamentary forum on population and development (EPF), the summit brought together parliamentarians from across the political spectrum, including the UK Liberal Democrat Jenny Tonge, French Socialist Philippe Tourtelier, and George Tsereteli, a centre-right MP from Georgia. EPF secretary Neil Datta argues that “each political party has a value base that can be supportive of reproductive health”, and that the trick is to mobilise support without politicising debate. Above all, it’s the economic case for supporting girls – popularised by the social media-savvy “Girl Effect” campaign and promoted by the World Bank – that is bringing unexpected allies to the table.

According to Gill Greer, director-general of the International planned parenthood federation, every year a girl spends in secondary school pushes her future wages up by 15-20%, and women generally re-invest 90% of their earnings in their communities. The World Bank agrees, and has thus decided to back programmes focusing conditional cash transfers on women, and providing vouchers to employers who hire women. For the bank’s expert on gender, Mayra Buvinic, investing in girls is simply “smart economics.” For Greer, the argument that investment in the rights and health of girls can spur economic growth provides a powerful tool for advocates seeking consensus on politically sensitive issues such as reproductive health. And according to Datta, arguments about the economic benefits of gender equality, reproductive health, and family planning have helped to garner cross-party support in donor countries including Ireland, Spain, and the Netherlands.

But making women work for the market is not the same thing as making markets work for women, and the economic argument for investing in girls is not without its critics. Earlier this year, a debate about the Girl Effect campaign rippled across the development blogosphere, sparked in part by a provocative critique on Aid Watch. Guest blogger Anna Carella argued that the Girl Effect plays into stereotypes of women as natural caregivers and reinforces perceptions of “women’s work” and “men’s work”. It further neglects crucial macroeconomic issues and prioritises the wellbeing of the economy over the wellbeing of women, she said. “While this campaign seems like a godsend for those who have been working to improve the lives of women, it may actually be damaging to women.”

Meanwhile, Elaine Zuckerman, a former World Bank economist, has taken aim at the bank’s gender action plan and policy, criticising its dismissal of human rights and arguing that the “business case for gender equality” only perpetuates the bank’s neo-liberal agenda. And for Datta, the risk is that programmes favouring quick fixes will win over long-term strategies to tackle deep-rooted power relations that require generations to surmount.

All of this leaves global gender advocates in a tricky position. They have an argument that has garnered unprecedented support for traditionally neglected issues and divisive debates. Linking gender equality with economic growth offers a convincing argument at a time when budget cuts and austerity talk put NGOs and aid agencies under enormous pressure to provide innovative approaches to entrenched development issues. And it’s an agenda that shows no sign of losing steam. Next year, the World Bank will dedicate its flagship World Development Report to gender equality. And the bank’s International Development Association (IDA) fund, which provides soft loans and grants to the poorest countries, has made gender equality one if its four priority themes. But to benefit from this unprecedented focus without seeing stickier issues slip off the agenda – such as the hard-to-measure but crucial issues of women’s rights, empowerment, and long-term generational change – is no small task. Without a doubt, this is a debate to watch.

• This article was amended on 20 May 2011. The original referred to Elaine Zuckerman as an economist from the World Bank’s independent evaluation group. This has been corrected.

See original article here, http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/poverty-matters/2011/may/18/difficult-issue-gender-economics

 

“Next step in parental leave is tailoring it to give women best career rebirth”

Some commentary on the new Australian Parental Leave scheme proposed by the new Liberal government.

“Next step in parental leave is tailoring it to give women best career rebirth”

Article from Melissa Grah-McIntosh of the Brisbane Times September 11, 2013

Policies with impact for a productive society”

from Women on Boards (WOB’s)

Pay equity, women in leadership and childcare were the issues nominated as the most important to women in a recent survey of more than 1,000 members of Women on Boards.

Paid Parental Leave (PPL) was ranked the issue of least importance.

The survey was conducted over two weeks by Women on Boards to their database of more than 15,000 professional women with 1095 responses.

The purpose of the survey is to inform the future government, policy makers and the business community of issues impacting on the productivity, leadership potential and economic well being of women in Australia.

WOB Directors, Claire Braund and Ruth Medd, said the survey highlighted the complexity around the inter-related issued of maintaining workforce productivity while enabling employees to contribute to the social economy through parental and other caring responsibilities.

“The issues are complex and it is very clear that single issue policies implemented in isolation will not address the rapidly changing needs of male and female workers, business and society,” Braund and Medd said.”  see the rest of the article here